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TM Bush Volunteers

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Notices on Our Content (hover on each phrase): Member Protected Content  Walk Access Restrictions May Apply   

 Our Group Activity Reports:   Nature Walks   Birdos   Bushwalks   FoTNP     Activity Maps:   Nature Walks    Bushwalks   FoTNPcontentmap-bw-s

Cedar Creek gets a boost

 2017-02-04 FoTNP Work Event Cedar Creek Falls TNP SectionCedar Creek section of Tamborine National Park is popular destination and has one of the highest visitation rates of any national park in south east Queensland.  It has also been in the news with parking not being adequate for the number of visitors.  While most visitors cannot wait to get to the pools at the bottom of the waterfall, some visitors come to have a quiet picnic and take in the sounds and smells of the forest.  Their visit recharges their feeling of wellbeing and they leave with great memories of Cedar Creek. 

 

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FoTNP volunteers help injured Tamborine forest

2016-03-05 TNP - Knoll Section - below Cthe chimney_100Some 150 metres downhill behind the old stone chimney, the remains of Jack’s Cabin, on Knoll Road, Tamborine Mountain, the Friends of Tamborine National Park discovered a wound in the forest about half a hectare in size. Many years ago a forest giant died and made a hole in the rainforest canopy. What’s the problem with that you might ask? Isn’t that just a natural process? Well yes but the problem with this event is that as soon as there is a break in the canopy and enough light on the forest floor, the invasive weed species step in. Lantana and privet are the first to colonise this wound in the forest. The native pioneer plants that would heal the wound and restore the forest to healthy biodiversity do not get a chance. The invasive exotic weeds grow fast and out-compete the native trees. Once lantana has a hold, it stops the natural succession and regeneration of the forest.

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What’s in a name?

2016-02 FoTNP - TNP KnollRd Down the Slope 2The Tamborine Bush Volunteers has commenced the year with a new revegetation project in The Knoll Section of Tamborine National Park.

This dedicated group has been working on Tamborine Mountain for 28 years and has removed introduced weeds from 20 national park plots and replanted with rainforest species. Some plots have taken on the appearance of mature rainforests.

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Tamborine Bush Volunteers Moving In

TBV tool shed key handoverThe Tamborine Bush Volunteers (TBV) are moving in.  The TBV have been regenerating sections of Tamborine National Park for 23 years.  Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service has provided a toolshed on leased land in Beacon Road, North Tamborine for the group to store tools and equipment.  The toolshed is the first step in re-establishing the group’s rainforest nursery to continue propagation of rainforest plants for national park regeneration. This was an activity the group was involved in at the old Knoll Road QPWS site for 13 years.

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Main Street Blitz Phase 2 - A Willing and Accomplished Crew

Main Street after plantingFair mountain weather was used to great advantage by the volunteer crew of the good ship T.M. Joint Project for the Main Street Blitz Phase 2 on Saturday morning 4th June. The hearties of the Tamborine Bush Volunteers (TBV) and Tamborine Mountain Landcare (TML) achieved a significant amount of restoration work in the National Park strip adjacent to the RSL War Memorial.

By the time shipmates Laurelle and Judith had set up a delicious morning tea at 10 a.m. a small sea of white tipped wooden stakes marked the sites where native gingers, endemic clumping grasses and local palm trees had been planted, fertilised, mulched and watered. Foreign pest plants had flourished before Phase 1 of the Blitz, but now it won’t be too long before the area becomes very attractive to native birds and animals. All plants used were supplied by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service and were certified pest and Myrtle Rust free.

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okoaraInjured Wildlife

Wildcare SEQ (07) 5527 2444

RSPCA / DEHP Brisbane - Gold Coast

1300 ANIMAL (1300264625)

Elsewhere in Australia

Feral Animal Control

Book - Mistletoes of Subtropical Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria

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Copies of the excellent & definitive “ The Mistletoes of Subtropical Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria” by local authors John Moss & Ross Kendall now on sale at $27.50 from Mike Russell (5545 3601).

Book - Flora and Fauna of Tamborine Mountain

tm flora  fauna book cover 1 20140720 1523868399

TAMBORINE MOUNTAIN FLORA & FAUNA by Russell, Leiper, White, Francis, Hauser, McDonald & Sims is now on sale at local outlets for $15.  

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Gallery Tree

Random Images - Friends of TNP Bush Volunteers

  • 2008 Nov - TNP Joalah Section -Our Work team with students
  • 2007 Nov - Pirralilla Section - Harry
  • 1988 TNP Cedar Creek - John and Jenny
  • Description:

    A band of volunteers have finished their first major project towards upgrading the increasingly popular National Park on Tamborine Mountain in the Gold Coast Hinterland.

  • 2010 Aug - TNP Joalah Section - National Tree Day Group
  • 2010 Nov - TNP - Geissemenn Dr
  • tbv-20years

Why does attentiveness to nature matter? In a very fundamental sense, we are what we pay attention to. Paying heed to beauty, grace, and everyday miracles promotes a sense of possibility and coherence that runs deeper and truer than the often illusory commercial, social "realities" advanced by mainstream contemporary culture. ... Our attention is precious, and what we choose to focus it on has enormous consequences. What we choose to look at, and to listen to--these choices change the world. As Thich Nhat Hanh has pointed out, we become the bad television programs that we watch. A society that expends its energies tracking the latest doings of the celebrity couple is fundamentally distinct from one that watches for the first arriving spring migrant birds, or takes a weekend to check out insects in a mountain stream, or looks inside flowers to admire the marvelous ingenuities involved in pollination. The former tends to drag culture down to its lowest commonalities; the latter can lift us up in a sense of unity with all life. The Way of Natural History, edited by Thomas Lowe Fleischner and published by Trinity University Press (Texas)