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Leader - Colin
Total Distance: - Killarney Glen - 6.0k, Denham Reserve 3.0k
Walkers – Paul, John, Leonie & Peter, Colin

2014-02-08 Killarney Glen & Emerald PoolsIt was a glorious start to the day after expectations that it might be wet.  Five of us made our way to Killarney Glen.  As there was only a handful of us further exploration of this beautiful area was high on the agenda.

After arriving at the camp site and making out way down to Killarney Falls we discussed exploration options.  We decided we would go up to the track on the eastern side and then make our way up to a gully which Pat Fitzgerald had described as being above the Emerald Pools.  As we made our way up we passed the junction to the Amethyst Fields.  The gully was badly eroded but manageable and we finally arrived at Emerald Pools.  As it was still early we decided to continue to walk up Back Creek, coming across more rock pools and cascades. 

Report

We found a large rock pool which was in the shade from trees on the eastern bank - a great place for smoko.  The stillness, reflections and quiet was very relaxing. Rather than go back the way we came we meandered down back creek, rock hopping and admiring the views.  At every corner we came across more rock pools and cascades – what a beautiful area.  We continued on past the camp site to Platypus Pool where Paul and I had a dip before a leisurely lunch.  With still plenty of time on our hands we decided to move up to Denham Reserve.

At Denham Reserve we made the usual stop at the Denham Falls lookout before continuing on to Lip Falls.  Plenty of visitors on such a beautiful day and we found children jumping from the top of Lip Falls.  A very picturesque scene. 

Everyone was mindful now of getting back to Michele’s place where coffee and chocolate cake was awaiting us.  This was a great way to finish off a great walk with even more exploration ideas for this iconic area - Colin.

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Why does attentiveness to nature matter? In a very fundamental sense, we are what we pay attention to. Paying heed to beauty, grace, and everyday miracles promotes a sense of possibility and coherence that runs deeper and truer than the often illusory commercial, social "realities" advanced by mainstream contemporary culture. ... Our attention is precious, and what we choose to focus it on has enormous consequences. What we choose to look at, and to listen to--these choices change the world. As Thich Nhat Hanh has pointed out, we become the bad television programs that we watch. A society that expends its energies tracking the latest doings of the celebrity couple is fundamentally distinct from one that watches for the first arriving spring migrant birds, or takes a weekend to check out insects in a mountain stream, or looks inside flowers to admire the marvelous ingenuities involved in pollination. The former tends to drag culture down to its lowest commonalities; the latter can lift us up in a sense of unity with all life. The Way of Natural History, edited by Thomas Lowe Fleischner and published by Trinity University Press (Texas)