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Leader - Steve

Total Distance walked - 9.8k

2012-06-09 Mt MathiesonEarly morning and it was raining on Mt Tamborine so we had no idea what we were in for as this walk is on the Main Range which is well known for its heavy rainfall.

Ten walkers had braved the inclement weather so we set off with high hopes of a dry walk once we left the mountain. Jeanette and a guest walker, Pat had also joined us for the day. After the arbitrary stop at Aratula, Paul cannot go past the bakers shop here without stopping for a sausage roll, we continued on to the camping area at Spicers Gap for the start of our walk (see the Google Earth track of our walk below).

Report

Mt Mathieson must have had heavy winds in the past few days as there were lots of branches and small trees lying across the track. Unfortunately these were left to the leader to remove, much to the amusement of the following walkers.

We had smoko on a high ridge with sweeping views out to Cunningham’s Gap and further north along the magnificent Main Range National Park. This is a really nice part of the walk as it is through a rocky ridge section before continuing through into the rainforest. With the help of her walking stick Julie managed to take a group photo at the old timber jinker.

Once we reached the old historic road we turned south towards Spicers Gap only to be rudely interrupted by 3 very noisy trail bike riders who had ridden past a “No Trail Bike” sign. Lunch was sitting on the rocky outcrop at Governors Chair looking east over the Fassifern Valley. One of the best views from the Main Range.

After lunch we walked the fire trail back to the car park with a short stop at “Moss’s Well”. We had trouble finding a coffee shop open at Boonah but after walking the main street we found one open.

Another great day of walking - Steve

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Why does attentiveness to nature matter? In a very fundamental sense, we are what we pay attention to. Paying heed to beauty, grace, and everyday miracles promotes a sense of possibility and coherence that runs deeper and truer than the often illusory commercial, social "realities" advanced by mainstream contemporary culture. ... Our attention is precious, and what we choose to focus it on has enormous consequences. What we choose to look at, and to listen to--these choices change the world. As Thich Nhat Hanh has pointed out, we become the bad television programs that we watch. A society that expends its energies tracking the latest doings of the celebrity couple is fundamentally distinct from one that watches for the first arriving spring migrant birds, or takes a weekend to check out insects in a mountain stream, or looks inside flowers to admire the marvelous ingenuities involved in pollination. The former tends to drag culture down to its lowest commonalities; the latter can lift us up in a sense of unity with all life. The Way of Natural History, edited by Thomas Lowe Fleischner and published by Trinity University Press (Texas)