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Birdos

Notices on Our Content (hover on each phrase): Member Protected Content  Walk Access Restrictions May Apply

 

 Our Group Activity Reports:   Nature Walks   Birdos   Bushwalks   FoTNP     Activity Maps:   Nature Walks    Bushwalks   FoTNPcontentmap-bw-s

News from our Birdos including Bird Walk reports. For local Tamborine Mountain Nature Walks go here.

2015 08 12 TMNHA BIRD WALK REPORT - Eagleby Wetlands

male Red-backed WrenThe weather was perfect for our mornings birding which started on the boardwalk and the adjacent lakes.  Scarlet Honeyeaters were calling and looking for nesting sites in the trunks of the Melalukias, such a bright red of the males early in the morning got the walk off to a good start. Brown Honeyeaters were in abundance along with calling Tawny Grassbirds and Cisticolas and in the grasses near the lakes were Red-backed Fairy Wrens, Little Grassbirds and Superb Fairy Wrens.

 

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2015 07 08 TMNHA BIRD WALK REPORT - Coombabah Wetlands

male Variegated Fairy wrenThe weather was kind for our walk in Coombabah Wetlands; chilly to start, then warming up nicely and having had enough rain to lay the dust without making the tracks too wet.  We followed our usual route;  first the board walk, then the main track to the wetlands (where we saw hardly any birds) then up to the cut, along the banks and back down the sewer line to the car park.  
Bird numbers were not great at this time of year but we were able to watch a pair of Kookaburras taking it in turns to bash a larger hole in an termites’ nest, preparatory to doing their own nesting.  Some of us also got a very good, close look at a White-necked Heron stalking purposefully through the grass and apparently unworried by us watching him. 

 

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2014 11 12 TMNHA BIRD WALK REPORT - Lamington National Park

Albert LyrebirdsOn arrival in Lamington National Park we started the morning on the board walk leading to the tree top experience. Along the way were three different scrub wrens feeding, Yellow throated, White-browed & large–billed. We heard the lovely call of a Golden Whistler; saw many Rufous Fantails chasing each other & a calling Shining Bronze cuckoo no doubt looking for the Thornbills.   After the canopy walk we followed the trail to the Green Mountain Botanical Gardens where we were very lucky to observe, close up, an Adult Albert’s Lyrebird  feeding a large juvenile.

 

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2015 02 11 TMNHA BIRD WALK REPORT - Springbrook

Superb Blue Wren Our first stop was Springbrook National Park Settlement Day Area which has a large covered picnic area, and it was just as well because the rain started to fall as we parked the cars.  We decided to have a cuppa and wait for the rain to clear.  After about half an hour, the sun came out  and we started our walk.  As we were leaving the day area we saw two raptors identified by their calls, Pacific Bazas.  Then we walked along the creek and saw White-headed Pigeon and Brown Cuckoo-Dove and other familiar birds as we entered the National Park.

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2014 10 08 TMNHA BIRD WALK REPORT- Gold Coast Hinterland

Barking OwlAlthough the temperature for the day was forecast to be in the thirties, nine members turned up for the walk.  After an early start we drove to Hinterland Regional Park in Hardys Road, Mudgeeraba, a parkland of 62 hectares with mostly grassed walking tracks.  This area was the first Mudgeeraba land settled by Europeans in 1869.  It has undergone many changes since then from timber cutting, clearing and grazing; disturbance by construction of water pipelines and powerlines has aided the invasion of weeds.  A very active bushcare group is working with Council to restore some of the natural bushland areas within the parkland.  We recorded 42 species.  After a very welcome morning tea, we drove to Schuster Park, Tallebudgera.  The day was heating up!

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Birdo events at this link

okoaraInjured Wildlife

Wildcare SEQ (07) 5527 2444

RSPCA / DEHP Brisbane - Gold Coast

1300 ANIMAL (1300264625)

Elsewhere in Australia

Feral Animal Control

Book - Mistletoes of Subtropical Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria

Mistletoes 230w

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copies of the excellent & definitive “ The Mistletoes of Subtropical Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria” by local authors John Moss & Ross Kendall now on sale at $27.50 from Mike Russell (5545 3601).

Book - Flora and Fauna of Tamborine Mountain

tm flora  fauna book cover 1 20140720 1523868399

TAMBORINE MOUNTAIN FLORA & FAUNA by Russell, Leiper, White, Francis, Hauser, McDonald & Sims is now on sale at local outlets for $15.  

. More Details Link

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Random Images - Birdos

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  • may2009 eagleby wetlands 8s.jpg

Why does attentiveness to nature matter? In a very fundamental sense, we are what we pay attention to. Paying heed to beauty, grace, and everyday miracles promotes a sense of possibility and coherence that runs deeper and truer than the often illusory commercial, social "realities" advanced by mainstream contemporary culture. ... Our attention is precious, and what we choose to focus it on has enormous consequences. What we choose to look at, and to listen to--these choices change the world. As Thich Nhat Hanh has pointed out, we become the bad television programs that we watch. A society that expends its energies tracking the latest doings of the celebrity couple is fundamentally distinct from one that watches for the first arriving spring migrant birds, or takes a weekend to check out insects in a mountain stream, or looks inside flowers to admire the marvelous ingenuities involved in pollination. The former tends to drag culture down to its lowest commonalities; the latter can lift us up in a sense of unity with all life. The Way of Natural History, edited by Thomas Lowe Fleischner and published by Trinity University Press (Texas)